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Read Abstracts from the Veterinary Orthopedic Society Conference

Ft. Collins, Colorado, April 14, 2015 —Two ACVSMR residents, Dr. Brittany Jean Carr and Dr. Juliette Hart, presented abstracts at the Veterinary Orthopedic Society Conference held in Sun Valley, Idaho. We are pleased to present both abstracts below.

Title: Canine Platelet Rich Plasma Systems: A Multicenter, Prospective Analysis

Brittany Jean Carr, DVM, Sherman O. Canapp Jr., DVM, MS, DACVS, DACVSMR, David R. Mason, BVetMed, MRCVS, DACVS, DECVS, DACVSMR, Catherine Cox, MS, Theresa Hess, DVM

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to prospectively analyze and compare key parameters of the PRP product from five commercial canine PRP systems in healthy, adult canines

Materials & Methods: Five commercial systems were analyzed using 10 healthy dogs per system: SmartPReP®2 ACP+ (Harvest Technologies, Corp), Arthrex ACP (Arthrex Orthobiologics), CRT Pure PRP (Canine Regenerative Therapies), ProTec PRP (Pulse Veterinary Technologies, LLC), and C-PET Canine Platelet Enhancement Therapy (Pall Corporation). Blood was obtained from each dog according to each system's manufacture’s protocol. The mean baseline platelet, RBC, WBC, neutrophil, monocyte and lymphocyte concentrations were determined for each system. All blood samples were processed according to the manufacture's protocols. The mean PRP product platelet, RBC, WBC, neutrophil, monocyte and lymphocyte concentrations were determined for each system, which were compared to the mean baseline values.

Results: The SmartPRep®2 ACP+ and CRT Pure PRP systems significantly increased platelet concentration (p<0.0001). All systems significantly decreased the RBC concentration (p<0.0001). The CRT Pure PRP, Arthrex ACP, ProTec PRP, and C-PET Canine Platelet Enhancement Therapy systems significantly decreased neutrophil concentration (p<0.0001).

Click on the graphs to enlarge.

Platelet Comparison
Red Blood Cell Comparison
White Blood Cell Comparison
Neutrophil Comparison
Monocyte Comparison
Lymphocyte Comparison

Discussion/Conclusion: Only the CRT Pure PRP system increased platelet concentration while significantly reducing the RBC and neutrophil concentrations. Further study is indicated to assess the efficacy of canine PRP systems and PRP therapy in canines.

Acknowledgement: Regenerative medicine products were received from the following companies for validation: Harvest, CRT, Arthrex, and PulseVet.

 

Title: Comparison of Pet-Owner Satisfaction with Stifle Orthoses or Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy for the Treatment of Cranial Cruciate Ligament Disease in Dogs

JL Hart, KD May, CS Goh, RH Palmer, NR Kieves, P Mich, FM Duerr

Introduction: There is a lack of information describing stifle orthoses outcome for treatment of canine cranial cruciate ligament disease (CCLD). The study purpose was to compare pet-owner satisfaction following surgical/non-surgical treatment of CCLD.

Materials & Methods: Online survey to pet-owners: either a stifle orthosis (ORTHOSIS) or tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) for CCLD

Results: The ORTHOSIS group response rate was 25% and 37% for the TPLO group. Greater than 85% of owners in both groups would repeat the chosen treatment again (P=0.32). A greater number of TPLO dogs showed no/mild lameness following intervention (98%, P=0.04) compared to the ORTHOSIS group (88%). A larger number of TPLO owners rated the treatment as excellent (TPLO:68%; ORTHOSIS:41%, P=0.003). Forty-four percent of ORTHOSIS owners reported skin issues. Thirteen percent of ORTHOSIS dogs subsequently underwent a surgical procedure on the treated leg and eight percent of owners reported their dog never adjusted to the orthosis.

Discussion/Conclusion: A high percentage in both groups reported positive satisfaction. Owners selecting stifle orthoses should be advised of the potential for complications including persistent lameness, skin issues, orthosis non-acceptance, and subsequent surgery.

Acknowledgement: Dr. Mich (OrthoPets co-owner); Dr. Duerr is a paid consultant for OrthoPets.

Comparison of Pet-Owner Satisfaction with Stifle Orthoses or Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy for the Treatment of Cranial Cruciate Ligament Disease in Dogs Hart JL1; May KD2; Goh CS1; Palmer RH1; Kieves NR1; Mich P3; Duerr FM1, (1)Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, (2)The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, (3)OrthoPets, Denver, CO

 

 

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